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Snapping Matchlock
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Snapping Matchlock is a type of matchlock mechanism used to ignite early firearms. It was used in Europe from about 1475 to 1640, and in Japan from 1543 till about 1880. The serpentine a curved lever with a clamp on the end was strongly spring-loaded, and released by pressing a button, pulling a trigger, or even pulling a short string passing into the mechanism. The slow match held in the clamp swung into a flash pan containing priming powder. The flash from the flash pan travelled through the touch hole igniting the main propellant charge of the gun. As the match was often extinguished after its relatively violent collision with the flash pan, this type fell out of favour with soldiers, but was often used in fine target weapons. The technology was transported to Japan by Portuguese and flourished there until the 1900s. The Japanese Matchlock, or Tanegashima was based on an unknown model of Portuguese snapping matchlock, but was refined so that the difficulties with self-extinguishing matches were almost eliminated.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 28.03.2020
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Extractor (Firearms)
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! An extractor is a part in a firearm that serves to remove brass cases of fired ammunition after the ammunition has been fired. When the gun's action cycles, the extractor lifts or removes the spent brass casing from the firing chamber. Extractors can be found on bolt action, lever-action, pump action, semi-automatic and fully automatic firearms. Break-action shotguns, such as those with single or double barrels, typically have an extractor that operates when the action is broken open. Extractors are also found on revolvers, removing cases either singly or all at once. For rimless cases, an extractor groove in the ammunition may serve as the point from which the extractor works. For rimmed cases, the rim of the cartridge serves most commonly serves as the point from which the extractor works. Not all firearms have extractors. In bolt action, lever-action, pump action, and semi- or fully-automatic firearms, extractors typically work in conjunction with ejectors to remove completely a fired, empty cartridge case from the weapon. The extractor removes the cartridge case from the chamber, essentially pulling the case to the rear.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 28.03.2020
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